What Constitutes Freedom In Ferguson? Or In America?

Excuse me if I sometimes have a hard time understanding what constitutes freedom in this country. And before I even begin to explain what I mean by that, let me first acknowledge that I’m well aware people will respond to what I have to say by prosecuting me for conflation.

In June the Supreme Court ruled that so-called “buffer zones,” boundaries set up around abortion clinics, are unconstitutional. In other words, the Supreme Court felt that these zones, set up to protect patients from protestors, are a violation of protestors’ freedom. Of course the Supreme Court would like you to pay no attention to the freedom of the patients.

Now fast forward to present day in Ferguson, Missouri, where the police have set up designated areas for the press, what you could call “media zones.” And if the press dare exit one of these zones, they have faced hostile language and arrest by police. Now wait a second, if abortion clinic buffer zones are unconstitutional, then shouldn’t that ruling be uniformly applied? That means the Supreme Court cannot have a buffer zone (which it does…so yes, they are hypocrites), that also means we should not have media zones.

Pay no attention to that pesky First Amendment, the police are here now, and they will serve as your overlord for the duration of this event.

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on RedditPin on PinterestShare on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

GovernmentHuman RightsNews

#buffer zone#constitution#Ferguson#First Amendment#media zone#Missouri#police#rights#Supreme Court